philamuseum:

Did you know that early experiments in flash photography involved photographers filling a tray with magnesium powder, putting it on their heads, and igniting it to create a small explosion? Eventually, photographers mounted the tray to a stick to lift it—a bit more safely—above their heads. Learn more about how early photographers experimented with flash in this interesting piece from NPR’s “All Things Considered.” Then come visit “Artificial Light: Flash Photography in the Twentieth Century” at the Museum. But hurry—the exhibition closes August 3.”Midnight at the Bowery Mission Breadline,” 1909, by Lewis W. Hine

philamuseum:

Did you know that early experiments in flash photography involved photographers filling a tray with magnesium powder, putting it on their heads, and igniting it to create a small explosion? Eventually, photographers mounted the tray to a stick to lift it—a bit more safely—above their heads. Learn more about how early photographers experimented with flash in this interesting piece from NPR’s “All Things Considered.” Then come visit “Artificial Light: Flash Photography in the Twentieth Century” at the Museum. But hurry—the exhibition closes August 3.

Midnight at the Bowery Mission Breadline,” 1909, by Lewis W. Hine

Animals Sensed 2011 VA Quake

Staff at the Smithsonian National Zoological Park in Washington, D.C., reported that some of the animals in the park appeared to show behavior suggesting that they anticipated the earthquake from seconds to minutes before it was felt in the area. The earthquake was felt at the great ape exhibits during afternoon feeding time. About three to ten seconds before the quake, many of the apes abandoned their food and climbed to the top of a tree-like structure in the exhibit. The red-ruffed lemurs sounded an alarm call about 15 minutes before the quake, and the flock of 64 flamingos rushed about and grouped themselves together just before the quake. During the quake, some animals vocalized, some ran or dove for cover, and some stood up and stared at the walls of their enclosures. Some of the animals remained agitated for the rest of the day, while others calmed quickly. This reaction was similar to that of the 5.8 Wabash Quake in 2008, which struck during early-morning feeding at the St. Louis Zoo.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2011_Virginia_earthquake#Zoo_animal_reactions

Movie Trivia

The first test audience [of Roger Rabbit] was comprised mostly of 18-19-year-olds, who hated it. After nearly the entire audience walked out of the screening, Robert Zemeckis, who had final cut, said he wasn’t changing a thing.

bluepueblo:

Canyon, Fjadrargljufur, Iceland
photo via michele

bluepueblo:

Canyon, Fjadrargljufur, Iceland

photo via michele

fastcompany:

Less than 1% of women going to college plan to major in computer science, according to the American Association of University Women. Those are bleak numbers.
What will prompt more women to get into coding? The first step: paying teachers to recruit girls to take coding classes.
With $1 million in funding from Google’s Made With Code initiative, nonprofit DonorsChoose.org is rewarding teachers with money when they get four or more female students to complete a coding class online.
Read More>

fastcompany:

Less than 1% of women going to college plan to major in computer science, according to the American Association of University Women. Those are bleak numbers.

What will prompt more women to get into coding? The first step: paying teachers to recruit girls to take coding classes.

With $1 million in funding from Google’s Made With Code initiative, nonprofit DonorsChoose.org is rewarding teachers with money when they get four or more female students to complete a coding class online.

Read More>

When Eddie takes Roger Rabbit into the back room at the bar where Dolores works to cut apart the hand-cuffs, the lamp from ceiling is bumped and swinging. Lots of extra work was needed to make the shadows match between the actual room shots and the animation for very little viewer benefit. Today, “Bump the Lamp” is a term used by many Disney employees to refer to going that extra mile on an effect just to make it a little more special, even though most viewers or guests will never notice it. — IMDB