The Beast in Me

by Nick Lowe

The beast in me
Is caged by frail and fragile bars
Restless by day
And by night rants and rages at the stars
God help the beast in me

The beast in me
Has to learn to live with pain
And how to shelter from the rain
And in the twinkling of an eye
Might have to be restrained
God help the beast in me

Sometimes it tries to kid me
That it’s a teddy bear
And even somehow manage to vanish in the air
And that is when I must beware
Of the beast in me that everybody knows
They’ve seen him dressed in my clothes
Patently unclear
If it’s New York or New Year
God help the beast in me

The beast in me

mypubliclands:

The BLM-managed Powderhorn Wilderness in Colorado is found in a rugged, glacier-carved landscape of the northern reaches of the San Juan Mountains. The area consists of large expanses of alpine tundra, spruce forests, and several alpine lakes at nearly 12,000 feet in elevation. High-elevation plateaus were created by Teritary volcanic deposits, believed to be 5,000 feet thick in some areas. 
Visitors can explore more than 45 miles of trails within this area, including Powderhorn Lakes Trail, East Fork Trail, Powderhorn Park Trail, Middle Fork Trail, and Devil’s Creek Trail.  CLICK HERE to plan your adventure in this wilderness area.
Photo by Bob Wick, Wilderness Specialist for the BLM’s National Conservation Lands

mypubliclands:

The BLM-managed Powderhorn Wilderness in Colorado is found in a rugged, glacier-carved landscape of the northern reaches of the San Juan Mountains. The area consists of large expanses of alpine tundra, spruce forests, and several alpine lakes at nearly 12,000 feet in elevation. High-elevation plateaus were created by Teritary volcanic deposits, believed to be 5,000 feet thick in some areas. 

Visitors can explore more than 45 miles of trails within this area, including Powderhorn Lakes Trail, East Fork Trail, Powderhorn Park Trail, Middle Fork Trail, and Devil’s Creek Trail.  CLICK HERE to plan your adventure in this wilderness area.

Photo by Bob Wick, Wilderness Specialist for the BLM’s National Conservation Lands

(via earthstory)

westcoastscapes:

. . d i v a . . 

westcoastscapes:

. . d i v a . . 

"Caged Bird" by Maya Angelou

The caged bird sings
with a fearful trill
of things unknown
but longed for still
and his tune is heard
on the distant hill
for the caged bird
sings of freedom.

theladyintweed:

Beautiful Libraries:

Chatsworth House, England. 

theladyintweed:

Beautiful Libraries:

Chatsworth House, England. 

(via maclellansculpture)

earthstory:

A trashy map of Earth’s oceansHere’s an odd question…where does one ocean end and another begin? If you travel East from the Indian Ocean, you’ll eventually reach the Pacific, but when? Can you draw a line on a map? Not exactly the easiest thing is it? Cartographers could probably agree on a line but that’s just a convention.To answer that question, scientists from the University of New South Wales did something interesting. They tracked trash.The Earth’s oceans each have dominant currents that spin in circles around the basins known as gyres. They are driven by a combination of strong winds, upwelling, and weather patterns. Water in one of these gyres, and anything it is carrying, will tend to stay in that gyre for a while. In other words, water in some area is going to technically “be” in one of the oceans. There’s actually a natural dividing line in the oceans; water on one side will go one way, water on the other side will tend to go the other way.Water isn’t easy to track because one particle of water looks a lot like the one next to it, but solid particles can be tracked. There is so much trash in the world’s oceans that tracking the trash allows for tracking of the water flowing around it.That’s the source of this map. This is a map the boundary of Earth’s oceans defined by water flow patterns. It’s not exactly where you’d put the dividing line between the Pacific and Indian Oceans if you were drawing a line yourself, but that’s where the dividing line in the water is. A tongue of water in the Eastern Indian Ocean is being pulled regularly into the southern Pacific Gyre, probably enabled by the currents that encircle Antarctica.-JBBOriginal paper:http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/chaos/24/3/10.1063/1.4892530Read more:http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/sea-garbage-shows-ocean-boundaries/

earthstory:

A trashy map of Earth’s oceans

Here’s an odd question…where does one ocean end and another begin? If you travel East from the Indian Ocean, you’ll eventually reach the Pacific, but when? Can you draw a line on a map? Not exactly the easiest thing is it? Cartographers could probably agree on a line but that’s just a convention.

To answer that question, scientists from the University of New South Wales did something interesting. They tracked trash.

The Earth’s oceans each have dominant currents that spin in circles around the basins known as gyres. They are driven by a combination of strong winds, upwelling, and weather patterns. Water in one of these gyres, and anything it is carrying, will tend to stay in that gyre for a while. 

In other words, water in some area is going to technically “be” in one of the oceans. There’s actually a natural dividing line in the oceans; water on one side will go one way, water on the other side will tend to go the other way.

Water isn’t easy to track because one particle of water looks a lot like the one next to it, but solid particles can be tracked. There is so much trash in the world’s oceans that tracking the trash allows for tracking of the water flowing around it.

That’s the source of this map. This is a map the boundary of Earth’s oceans defined by water flow patterns. It’s not exactly where you’d put the dividing line between the Pacific and Indian Oceans if you were drawing a line yourself, but that’s where the dividing line in the water is. A tongue of water in the Eastern Indian Ocean is being pulled regularly into the southern Pacific Gyre, probably enabled by the currents that encircle Antarctica.

-JBB

Original paper:
http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/chaos/24/3/10.1063/1.4892530
Read more:
http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/sea-garbage-shows-ocean-boundaries/

The way this happened took us off guard. An individual on Facebook decided to report several hundred of these accounts as fake. These reports were among the several hundred thousand fake name reports we process every single week, 99 percent of which are bad actors doing bad things: impersonation, bullying, trolling, domestic violence, scams, hate speech, and more—so we didn’t notice the pattern. The process we follow has been to ask the flagged accounts to verify they are using real names by submitting some form of ID—gym membership, library card, or piece of mail. We’ve had this policy for over 10 years, and until recently it’s done a good job of creating a safe community without inadvertently harming groups like what happened here.

From Facebook’s apology to the LGBT community for its treatment of hundreds of people—including drag queens, transgender individuals, and others—who found themselves kicked off the social network due to the company’s real-name policy.

The company’s going to change its policy. The jerk who reported these people goes unnamed.

(via shortformblog)

I wish it need not have happened in my time,” said Frodo.
“So do I,” said Gandalf, “and so do all who live to see such times. But that is not for them to decide. All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.
— Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring (via zeldawilliams)

Star Wars Episode II Trivia (2)

Since the FX model of Boba Fett’s Slave I was on loan to the Smithsonian at the time of filming, a computer-generated version of the ship (with a different color scheme) had to be created.